29 November 2006

The Polish Room

And then there was the Polish Room...

Little did I know that there existed a small room in the fifth floor of Lockwood. And yet, there it was, sitting there quietly, with no one inside, but a dark alley of bound material.

And yet if you press rewind, you'll realize that Polish immigrants played a major part in Buffalo's history.

No wonder why.

Quiet though this room may seem, it declares its presence with this bronze plaque that waits for onlookers to gaze at, hanging at the eastern wall.



A bronze face bust (I know this is the wrong term, for the bust includes after all, the bust) protrudes from the wall. I wonder why the face doesn't look so alert, especially if it was made to last through the ages. Maybe he was tired being mounted in the wall after all those years?



A light fixture hangs on the corner of the room, near the window overlooking the Stadium outside. It never is turned on, just for display. Some figures of people, assumingly Polish, are on the stained glass.



Finally, as evident by the rather infrequent visits that this room receives, the bookshelves are rather dark, and a bit spooky. I wasn't even able to find the switch to light the room.



Up next: Buffalo at night...

3 comments:

  1. I'll have to show this to my lil sis, she went to school there at BU. So, how do you like that damn snow, hahaha! I lived in Jamestown on and off since I was 17. I traveled to Buffalo, almost daily, even in the snow. You do get used to it and my son still lives there. Take care and good luck!

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  2. Interesting room - many dark memories there, mmh?
    Nice shots! Continue that...

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  3. I love the Polish Room. I use it at least twice a week. The bronz portrait is of the great Polish poet Adam Mickiewicz, done by Stanislaw Roman Lewandowski. The lamp in the corner works and I turn it on whenever I am there. I've been trying to trick the staff into keeping it on overnight but they never do. The stained glass panes of Chopin, Mickiewicz, Paderewski, and Slowacki were done by Joseph C. Mazur. The light switch is on the left when you enter the room, but be carefull it might give you a little shock. The Polish Room is hands down the best place to study at UB, no one will ever bother you, or even be able to find you.

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