23 February 2012

Gallivanting in Honduras: Macaw Mountain Bird Park

You know how many people want a bird for a pet? This colorful bird, with splendid colorful feathers, in a cage? That's cute, right? Except when people don't want it anymore. This is where Macaw Mountain Bird Park comes in. This bird sanctuary is actually inhabited with several different species of macaws, toucans, parrots, and other interesting avian animals, that used to be pets, and yet somehow, their owners don't want them anymore.






This park is set in a rural area in Honduras, a tuk-tuk ride away from Copán. Entry is 10 USD. The park involves several large cages where scarlet macaws inhabit, as they recover from being a domesticated animal. The thing is, scarlet macaws live free in Honduras, in fact, I saw them flying above me in another location, but since the birds in this park were all formerly pets, they couldn't live on their own.

Anyway, without further ado, let me show you the photos of the birds.










There is also a petting area, where birds roam free. They can even perch on your shoulder, on your hands, and wherever you want them to perch. Seriously, it was fun I never had in a while. Seriously amazing.














So yes. This was the first thing I saw in Honduras. And I was mesmerized.

4 comments:

  1. The colours are so vibrant that they look fake! :-D I know they aren't though: I haven't visited the park but I took pictures of the Macaw at the entrance of the Copan Ruins!

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  2. Zhu,

    Haha, I should say I did enhance the colors a bit. That being said, there really is an abundance of colors in that town. And yes, at the entrance to the Copan Ruinas, I couldn't believe that the birds fly wild!

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  3. If these were formerly pets, do they talk at all? Would be interesting to know what Spanish bad words they've learned to speak :)

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  4. Dennis,

    Hahahaha! I should have thought about that. I never tried making them talk, although some tourists were shouting "Hola!" at them, and some were parroting it back.

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